Crisis Helpline

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Suicide

Learning that someone you love is having suicidal thoughts can be frightening. It can be even more frightening if you find yourself thinking about giving up on life because you don’t believe there is a solution to your suffering. Dismissing these kinds of thoughts can have devastating outcomes. No suicidal behavior or attempt should be taken lightly!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, suicide is a leading cause of death in the U.S. affecting ALL ages, races, genders, sexuality, denominations, incomes and educational levels – suicide can affect anyone and everyone. Mental health conditions such as depression, bipolar disorder, schizophrenia, or alcoholism are often seen as the cause of suicide, but suicide is rarely caused by any single factor. Other problems often contribute to suicide including negative feelings about relationships; substance use; physical health; and job, money, legal, or housing stress.

Th behaviors listed below may be a sign that someone you love is contemplating suicide:

  • Talking about wanting to die or wanting to kill themselves
  • Talking about feeling empty, hopeless, or having no reason to live
  • Planning or looking for a way to kill themselves
  • Talking about great guilt or shame
  • Talking about feeling trapped or feeling that there are no solutions
  • Feeling unbearable pain, both physical or emotional
  • Talking about being a burden to others
  • Using alcohol or drugs more often
  • Acting anxious or agitated
  • Changing eating and/or sleeping habits
  • Showing rage or talking about seeking revenge
  • Talking or thinking about death often
  • Giving away important possessions
  • Saying goodbye to friends and family
  • Putting affairs in order, making a will
  • Withdrawal from friends, family and community
  • Dramatic mood swings
  • Impulsive or reckless behavior
  • Mental illness, alcoholism or drug abuse
  • Previous suicide attempts, family history of suicide, or history of trauma or abuse
  • Terminal illness or chronic pain, a recent loss or stressful life event
  • Social isolation and loneliness
  • Access to firearms
  • Gender. Although more women than men attempt suicide, men are nearly 4 times more likely to die by suicide.
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How We Help

If you or a loved one is experiencing a mental health condition like suicide, YOU ARE NOT ALONE! The Center for Health Care Services can help. Our Adult Behavioral Health Division offers the following comprehensive services.

In the event of a mental health crisis, including suicidal or homicidal thoughts, please call the 24-Hour Crisis & Substance Use Helpline at 800-316-9241 or 210-223-SAFE (7233). If harm to self or others is imminent, call 9-1-1.

CHCS helps people find hope, determine their path to wellness, and discover their way to an independent, productive life.

  • Psychiatric evaluation and treatment
  • Medical follow-ups and management
  • Wellness counseling, education and therapy
  • Integrated and primary care
  • Individual and group therapy
  • Psychosocial rehabilitation
  • Case management
  • Crisis services
  • And other services to support each person’s goals for recovery

Programs

Outpatient Mental Health Services for Adults

Comprehensive mental health services to support each person’s goals for recovery, including: psychiatric evaluation and treatment, medication management, wellness counseling and education, individual and group therapy, psychiatric care, psychosocial rehabilitation, and case management offered at a variety of locations.

How to Enroll in Adult Behavioral Health Services

For more information, or to enroll in mental health services, please call: 

Adults: 210-261-1250

Children: 210-261-3350

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